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Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding

Mit Press

Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Product image 1Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Product image 2Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Product image 3Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Product image 4Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Product image 5Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions
Product image 6Surf Craft: Design and the Culture of Board Riding - Three Wolves Provisions

Details:

The evolution of the surfboard, from traditional Hawaiian folk designs to masterpieces of mathematical engineering to mass-produced fiberglass.

Surfboards were once made of wood and shaped by hand, objects of both cultural and recreational significance. Today most surfboards are mass-produced with fiberglass and a stew of petrochemicals, moving (or floating) billboards for athletes and their brands, emphasizing the commercial rather than the cultural. Surf Craft maps this evolution, examining surfboard design and craft with 150 color images and an insightful text. From the ancient Hawaiian alaia, the traditional board of the common people, to the unadorned boards designed with mathematical precision (but built by hand) by Bob Simmons, to the store-bought longboards popularized by the 1959 surf-exploitation movie Gidget, board design reflects both aesthetics and history. The decline of traditional alaia board riding is not only an example of a lost art but also a metaphor for the disintegration of traditional culture after the Republic of Hawaii was overthrown and annexed in the 1890s.

Surf Craft is published in conjunction with an exhibition at San Diego's Mingei International Museum.

 

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